Insulin Glulisine Alcohol Interaction



Insulin Glulisine Alcohol

Iinsulin glulisine is used to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. It is a recombinant insulin analog which is equal to human insulin, that is one unit of one is equal to one unit of the other when given intravenously. When injected subcutaneously or under the skin the drus has a more rapid onset of action but a shorter duration than human insulin.

The dosage must be determined by individual blood glucose monitoring.

Alcohol consumption should be moderate but it is best not to drink as alcohol causes the blood glucose level to lower as it processes the alcohol.

At this time the medical community defines moderate consumption of alcohol as no more than two drinks per day and no more than 14 drinks per week. Anything more than that is considered an unhealthy dependency on alcohol that may have adverse social, family and health consequences.

If a person drinks only once or twice a week but drinks on the same days each week and more than two drinks this is considered as an alcohol dependency.

If a person binge drinks at any time during the week this is also considered as alcoholism.

Some consider alcoholism as a disease while others consider it an addiction which is the result of personal choice and character fault. This school of thought blames the alcoholism on life style choices.

Personally I consider alcoholism a genetic tendency as I have seen families of alcoholics even when they live far apart. These unfortunate people are probably dependent on alcohol from the first drink.

When alcohol interacts with prescription over the counter drugs it usually results in negative health effects most especially liver damage as the main organ affected.

It is suggested that before taking this or any other drug you have a frank and honest discussion with your physician as to your drinking habits. This may be difficult as many alcoholics are in a state of denial as to their drinking habits.

I have also noticed that many alcoholics are not subject to the morning after illness that most of us suffer through when we drink too much. Severe alcoholics usually find if they feel “shakey” in the morning, a drink will make them feel more normal.

Do not use this drug during episodes of hypoglycemia, to patients who are hypersensitive to Apidra or to any of its excipients. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction to insulin use and patients must be taught to recognize the condition and how to manage it. Severe hypoglycemia can lead to unconsciousness and/or convulsions and may result in temporary or permanent brain function or death.

Side Effects of are hypersensitivity and allergic reactions, hypokalemia, renal or hepatic impairment. Hypokalemia causes a shift in potassium from the extracellular to intracellular space. Untreated hypokalemia may cause respiratory paralysis, ventricular arrhythmia and death.

This site serves as an information source only and does not dispense medical advice or any other kind of advice. If you are seeking medical advice you are advised to consult your own physician.

Insulin Glulisine Alcohol

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